Sign in to follow this  
apach05

panonski hrt

Recommended Posts

mislim da je Jovica Plačkić u jednom tekstu o pulinima pomenuo da postoji pas hrtolikog oblika u vojvodini.Zainteresovo sam se za tu temu pa sam na jednom sajtu sam nasao nesto o toj rasi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once a common hunting dog in eastern Slavonia, Voivodina and parts of northern Bosnia, the Slavonian Greyhound was a slightly heavier breed than its Bosnian cousin. Some believe that it was developed by crossing the Posavac Hound with the Staro-Bosanski Hrt, the Pannonian Herder, the Staro-Srpski Hrt, the Croatian Sheepdog and the Hungarian Greyhound, but others also include the Kuvasz and the Viszla into the breed's ancestry. This rugged sighthound was also known as the Panonian Hound, Voivodjanski Hrt, Sremski Hrt, Brodski Gonic and even Zemunski Hrt, depending on the area, leading some authorities to conclude that these were either separate breeds or simply regional sub-types of the greater Panonian Greyhound population. This was a popular hunter of boars, foxes, hares and deer, but also a capable livestock herder and watchdog. Being a strictly working dog, bred only for its resilience and working qualities with little regard to its looks, the Slavonski Hrt wasn't uniformed in appearance and a few types within the breed existed, from lean medium-sized dogs to taller and heavier examples, as well as coming in a wide range of coat types and colourings. The breed eventually became extinct and by the mid-20th century, the Slavonian Greyhound and all its varieties were assimilated into the more popular breeds of the regions, namely the Croatian Greyhound, as well as some bloodlines of the Pannonian Sheepdog, Old Bosnian Hound and even the rare hunting variety of the Sylvan, which to this day is said to resemble certain strains old Slavonian sighthounds. Before the 1st World War, the Slavonski Hrt was a name commonly used to describe the eastern type of the Croatian Greyhound, but after WW2, the breed was rarely mentioned as anything more than a working cross and was eventually forgotten.

Due to the blood of herders, scenthounds, bird dogs, sighthounds and livestock guardians in its background, the Slavonian Hound was an all-around working dog, prized for its stamina, strenght, intelligence and drive, which were the qualities that made it a very common and popular breed in many different parts of the region. Some fanciers consider the use of the name "greyhound" to be incorrect when describing this old Slavonian breed, since it was quite heavier than most sighthounds. Long-legged, deep-chested and strongly boned, the Slavonski Hrt was a powerful and rugged worker, very agile and fast, although not as valued for its speed as its Bosnian, Croatian and Hungarian cousins, which were all typical lean greyhounds, much faster than dogs of Slavonia. The majority of the dogs had typical hound-ilke drop ears, but erect-eared specimens were also common, especially within the so-called Brodski type. Whether it was short, flat, smooth, long, rough or curly, the coat of the Slavonian Hound was the most valued in white-based colourings, with darker markings of various sizes, but also common in black-n-tan, wheaten, red, grey and black colourings, usually with white markings. The average height was 25 inches, but taller examples existed, depending on their home region

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Takodje sam nasao nesto o staro srpskom hrtu,bilo bi lepo da i mi kao nacija imamo jednu rasu hrtova u stvarnosti ,a ne samo u narodnim pesmama.Madjari su sacuvali svoje nacionalno blago(madjarski hrt)sad dali cemo mi to uspeti ili je mozda vec kasno?Evo nesto o staro srpskom hrtu:

Thought by most authorities to be extinct, the Staro-Srpski Hrt is claimed by some to be a heavier variant of the Old Bosnian Greyhound, while others believe it to be much older than its Bosnian cousin, tracing its ancestry to the great sighthounds of Greece and India, but also to the mountain shepherd dogs and wolf-killers of Serbia. The Old Serbian Greyhound is also seen as the ancestor of the original Irish Wolfhound, taken to Ireland by the Celtic tribes from the Balkans. Unlike the lighter Bosnian Greyhound and the much smaller Croatian Greyhound, the Serbian breed was very tall, massive and powerful, but also quite aggressive and driven. Whereas its western counterparts were strictly hunting dogs, the Staro-Srpski Hrt was also a ferocious guardian and a celebrated war-dog, as well as a superb large game hunter and racing dog. Some fanciers believe that the breed was developed by crossing the Zhuyan, Sylvan and Sarplaninac dogs with the Greek Harehound, Russian Borzoi and Turkish Tazi, but other breeds have likely played a role in its development as well. During the late 1800's and the first part of the 20th century, the English Greyhound and the Russian Borzoi were occasionally crossed into the breed's bloodline, but by the end of the 2nd World War, the Old Serbian Greyhound became very rare and then soon after declared as extinct. Although the breed is said to no longer exist, there are periodical reports of surviving specimens in some parts of Serbia, Bosnia, Macedonia and neighbouring regions, but it is unlikely that these dogs are pure, even though they're oftentimes presented as such. The future might bring successful breed revival, but for now there are no known efforts and the Staro-Srpski Hrt is widely ignored, although it continues to live on in ancient Serbian warrior poems and songs.

The Old Serbian Greyhound existed in two main types, these being the smooth-coated and rough-coated varieties. The more numerous bearded type was reportedly very aggressive and was the favourite variety of the Serbian warriors, who employed its great power and drive in their conflicts, most notably against the Turkish invaders. Somewhat similar to the Irish Wolfhound in appearance, the Staro-Srpski Hrt is a deep-chested, broad-shouldered and long-legged breed, capable of great speeds, but not as fast as the Bosnian Greyhound or the modern sighthounds from around the world. Although it was primarily used to hunt wild boars, wolves, bears and deer, the breed was also a capable hunter of hares, foxes and other small game of the region. As is the case with most working sighthounds, including the modern English Greyhound breed, a variety of ear-types existed, including some erect-eared specimens, but also regional examples with cropped ears. In some areas, the tail was docked, to prevent it from breaking during work. Regardless of coat type, the Old Serbian Greyhound was common in many colours, from pure white, yellow, fawn, red, grey, brindle and brown to various bicolours, such as white with darker patches, black-n-tan and grey with white markings. The average height is around 33 inches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gospodin Jovica Plackic je u jednom tekstu od pre par godina pomenuo da se ovaj ti pasa zadrzao u samom jednom selu u vojvodini.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this